Queensland COVID-19 research

This page of Queensland’s research related to the COVID-19 pandemic is compiled from information provided by Queensland universities and research institutes.

While many of our researchers are working on potential vaccines, treatments and other medical interventions, other researchers are applying their expertise to other impacts of the pandemic upon our economy and other aspects of society. The data includes immediate research activity, recent relevant work, proposed research (subject to available funds) and other responses using the resources and expertise of our research organisations.

Listing all of 12 matching responses out of 142 total responses.

  • The Immuno-Storm Chip for COVID-19 patients - An early warning for immune system over-reaction in cancer treatment and COVID-19 August 2021

    The team at the Centre for Personalised Nanomedicine, led by Prof Matt Trau, have developed a nanopillar chip to read molecular signatures in the blood, such as those left by immune cells. The latest data show that the majority of COVID-19 deaths seem to arise (very quickly) after a cytokine storm where the immune system of a patient over-responds to the infection, killing the patient. Deploying this technology, to detect these cytokine storms early, could save many lives by prioritising hospital treatment and resources to those patients in danger.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Professor Matt Trau
    Senior Group Leader
    m.trau@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 3346 4173
    Collaborations
  • Understanding immune dysregulation and secondary bacterial/fungal pneumonia in COVID-19 patients (the CoViBac study) April 2021

    A/Prof Erin Price and her colleagues at the Pathogen-Omics lab at the Sunshine Coast Health Institute, USC, are using dual RNA 'metatranscriptomic' sequencing (i.e. gene expression of the human host and their resident microorganisms) to characterise changes in the airway microbiomes and the human immune system during SARS-CoV-2 infection (the CoViBac study). This information is essential to devising better diagnostics and treatment strategies for people with COVID-19, and for preventing progression to severe disease.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Pathogen-Omics lab - Sunshine Coast Health Institute
    University of Sunshine Coast

    Contact details
    A/Prof Erin Price
    Co-lead of the Pathogen-Omics lab team
    eprice@usc.edu.au
    +61 7 5456 5568
    Collaborations
  • Chimeric insect-specific viruses for laboratory and point-of-care diagnosis of emergent viral disease. July 2021

    Effective outbreak response is reliant on the rapid production of scaleable, inexpensive and accurate diagnostic assays. This Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship project led by Dr. Jody Hobson-Peters from the UQ School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences will expand on an innovative program to use insect-specific viruses to produce authentic, recombinant antigens for emergent viruses, including COVID-19. These antigens will be applied to high-throughput laboratory assays and rapid hand-held diagnostics, enabling vigilant testing for viral disease in Queensland communities.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    A/Prof Jody Hobson-Peters
    Research Fellow
    j.peters2@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 336 54648
    Collaborations
    • Queensland Health
    • BioCifer
    • Australian Red Cross Lifeblood
  • Better statistical methods to discover host genetic factors in symptom response to SARS-CoV-2 infection August 2021

    The COVID-19 pandemic has infected >5 million people worldwide. While the majority of infected individuals recover within a few weeks of infection, others develop severe forms, that in some cases prove fatal. To date, the causes of differences in symptom response are unknown. In this proposal, we seek to discover genetic factors that can contribute to explaining these differences. Our findings have the potential to inform the design and analysis of clinical trials for vaccines and treatments.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Institute for Molecular Bioscience
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Doctor Loic Yengo Dimbou
    ARC DECRA Fellow
    l.yengo@imb.uq.edu.au
    +61 7 3346 2095
    Collaborations
  • The impact of diabetes on the severity of COVID-19 August 2021

    In conjunction with Mater Medical Research at the Translational Research Institute, a team at the Univeristy of Queensland, led by Dr. Kirsty Short is recruiting patients with and without diabetes who have been infected to determine whether all patients with diabetes are susceptible to severe COVID-19 or if there is a subset that is particularly susceptible. Funded by the Medical Research Future Fund, the researchers will also be investigating the long term immunity of patients to the virus and determining if this wanes faster in patients with diabetes.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Doctor Kirsty Short
    Australian Research Fellow
    k.short@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 336 54226
    Collaborations
  • Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on patients with reduced heart function June 2020

    Patients with reduced heart function may be particularly at risk as data indicates that severe COVID-19 infections can cause heart muscle damage and heart failure. Research led by Dr. Rivers, a Cardiologist at St Andrew’s War Memorial Hospital (part of Wesley Medical Research), aims to find out why COVID-19 is of particular risk to people with heart issues. The project involves 100 patients with reduced heart function who are diagnosed with COVID-19. Using smartphone technology to avoid the need to attend healthcare facilities, the impact of COVID-19 infection on measured heart function and symptoms of heart failure will be monitored over a period of 6 months.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    COVID-19 Rapid Response Research Centre
    Wesley Medical Research

    Contact details
    Doctor John Rivers
    Cardiologist at St Andrew’s Memorial Hospital
    jpr.epr@gmail.com
    +61 7 3016 1111
  • Development and validation of a Raman spectroscopy assay for COVID-19 antigen detection in mucus. August 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic has crippled economies, forced lockdowns and infected millions and killed thousands globally. In collaboration with a number of partner organisations this Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship project led by QUT's Dr. Kristyan Guppy-Coles will develop and validate a rapid, highly-accurate, inexpensive method for detecting COVID-19 in body fluid via novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Science and Engineering Faculty
    Queensland University of Technology

    Contact details
    Doctor Kristyan Guppy-Coles
    kristyan.guppycoles@qut.edu.au
    Collaborations
    • Metrohm
    • Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology
    • FLEW Solutions
  • A scalable virus trap for the COVID-19 virus - fast COVID-19 Testing May 2020

    In an extension of research to produce a quick and inexpensive test for Dengue Fever, researchers at UQ's AIBN and the CSIRO have developed a prototype for a rapid test for COVID-19 that could deliver results in 5-15 minutes and potentially identify COVID-19 ‘silent spreaders’ within the community. It uses a simple colour change from clear to blue liquid to indicate a positive test. The test’s simplicity and suitability for mass manufacture within Australia could make it suitable for a major step-change in mass population screening. The project has progressed to the prototype testing of a lateral flow device similar to low cost red/green light pregnancy testing kits. Using a nasal or throat swab, the device uses the reaction of proteins on nano-sized particles of a yeast to provide a cheap and very quick test result. The project is now funded by under the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative of the USA National Institutes of Health (NIH) to accelerate the project for large-scale manufacture of the device.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Professor Matt Trau
    Senior Group Leader - Trau Group
    m.trau@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 334 64173
    Collaborations
  • CoViBac: Host response and secondary pneumonia in COVID-19. August 2020

    Secondary infections and immune dysregulation represent life threatening yet poorly understood COVID-19 complications. This Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship joint project by the GeneCology Research Centre and Sunshine Coast Health Institute, led by Dr. Olusola Olagoke, will use cutting-edge next-generation sequencing technology alongside rapid diagnostics to better understand both the co-pathogens (bacteria, fungi, and viruses) and the aberrant immune responses driving COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Findings will assist Queensland healthcare facilities to better diagnose, treat, and ultimately prevent critically ill COVID-19 cases.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    GeneCology Research Centre and Sunshine Coast Health Institute
    University of the Sunshine Coast

    Contact details
    Doctor Olusola Olagoke
    Vaccine Research Fellow
    oolagoke@usc.edu.au
    Collaborations
    Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service
  • Deployable capability in extracting DNA from saliva & nasal swabs. April 2020

    Building on more than ten years’ experience as a paleogeneticist, researching the population genetics with specific expertise in ancient DNA retrieval and analysis, Dr. Sally Wasef at GU is using ancient DNA (aDNA) to help Indigenous communities identify and repatriate the remains of their ancient people. Dr. Wasef has deployable capability in extracting DNA from saliva & nasal swabs.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Environmental Futures Research Institute
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Doctor Sally Wasif
    Lecturer
    s.wasef@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 3735 4728
  • Point-of-care diagnostic device incorporating microfluidic technology and electrochemical biosensing platform for COVID-19 detection. August 2020

    This Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship project led by Dr. Yusuf Kaneti will develop a novel portable point-of-care diagnostic device for the rapid and sensitive detection of COVID-19 in non-clinical settings. This diagnostic device will incorporate micro?uidic technology and a portable electrochemical biosensor to provide all-in-one function for isolation, puri?cation, and detection of coronavirus RNA. The device will have the potential to accelerate COVID-19 testing in Queensland's regional areas.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Doctor Yusuf Kaneti
    v.kaneti@uq.edu.au
    Collaborations
    AI Fluidics Pty Ltd
  • Queensland Family Cohort Study investigates impacts of COVID-19 on Queensland babies June 2020

    A Queensland-first trial that will assess the impacts of COVID-19 on expectant parents and their unborn babies is being carried out at Mater Mothers’ Hospitals. Augmenting the current Queensland Family Cohort Study, the Mater Research research team are recruiting 300 families who have endured the stress brought on by the COVID-19 crisis, while being pregnant. Mater Research Professor Vicki Clifton said it was important to capture data from both expectant mothers and fathers during this once-in-a-lifetime pandemic to see what the impacts of the crisis were on families, the pregnancy and their babies as they developed. “We know from previous research undertaken on the impacts of the 2011 Queensland floods that you don’t need to be directly affected by a crisis to have increased stress hormones in your system and we know that this affects the placenta and there is a change in the developmental profiles of the baby.”

    “It’s important that while we have, and continue to experience a pandemic, that we are evaluating the impacts on these families and also how this will influence their babies’ development up until they are school age,” Professor Clifton said. The Queensland Family Cohort Study pilot began in 2018 with the aim to address disease at its core and determine how a baby’s health and exposure in early life influences the onset of disease in the future.

    #Diagnostics

    Centre

    Mater Research

    Contact details
    Professor Vicki Clifton
    Senior Research Fellow
    vicki.clifton@mater.uq.edu.au
    +61 4 2293 9723
    Collaborations
    • University of Queensland
    • Queensland University of Technology
    • Griffith University

Other Queensland COVID-19 initiatives

Queensland Government
Coronavirus (COVID-19) business assistance finder
Life Sciences Queensland
Life Sciences Queensland joins the data-powered alliance to stop COVID-19

Key Australian COVID-19 initiatives

Australian Academy of Science
Rapid Research Information Forum (RRIF)
COVID-19 Expert Database

Key international COVID-19 initiatives

CORD-19 (COVID-19 Open Research Dataset)
Free database of 130,000 plus COVID-19 open research papers