Queensland COVID-19 research

This page of Queensland’s research related to the COVID-19 pandemic is compiled from information provided by Queensland universities and research institutes.

While many of our researchers are working on potential vaccines, treatments and other medical interventions, other researchers are applying their expertise to other impacts of the pandemic upon our economy and other aspects of society. The data includes immediate research activity, recent relevant work, proposed research (subject to available funds) and other responses using the resources and expertise of our research organisations.

Listing all of 13 matching responses out of 121 total responses.

  • Building on years of experience in streptococcus and malaria research to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. April 2020

    Professor Michael Good AO and his research team based within the Laboratory of Vaccines for the Developing World at GU's Institute For Glycomics, are building on many years of vaccine development experience in streptococcus and malaria research to identify critical target points on the coronavirus that may be susceptible to immune attack and to use that information to develop a highly focussed vaccine. The team are working closely with the other researchers in the Institute and with colleagues at the Gold Coast University Hospital and China’s Olymvax Biopharmaceuticals Inc.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Institute for Glycomics
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Michael Good
    Principal Research Leader
    michael.good@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5552 9435
    Collaborations
  • Using propriety drug screening approaches for the rapid screening of known drugs April 2020

    Professor Michael Jennings and Dr. Christopher Day at GU's Institute of Glycomics have developed propriety biophysical drug screening approaches that allow for the rapid screening of known drugs that can be repurposed to target crucial steps in infectious disease processes. These approaches in combination with computational biology (led by fellow Research Leader, Associate Professor Thomas Haselhorst) are being applied to find solutions to COVID-19.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Institute for Glycomics
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Michael Jennings
    Deputy Director
    m.jennings@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5552 7050
  • Rapid assay system to evaluate potential drug and vaccine candidates to prevent the entry of SARS-CoV-2 April 2020

    Professor Johnson Mak and his research team at GU's Institute of Glycomics are working to establish a rapid assay system to evaluate potential drug and vaccine candidates that can prevent the entry of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) in collaboration with the other research teams within the Institute.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Institute for Glycomics
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Johnson Mak
    Research Leader
    j.mak@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5552 8077
    Collaborations
    Institute for Integrated and Intelligent Systems
  • Using advanced ex vivo (outside the body) human respiratory system models to evaluate existing drugs to prevent or treat COVID-19 April 2020

    Professor von Itzstein AO and his research team at GU's Institute of Glycomics are using advanced ex vivo (outside the body) human respiratory system models to evaluate existing drugs, and combinations, as drug candidates to prevent or treat COVID-19. The team is working in collaboration with Queensland Health Departments including Gold Coast University Hospital clinicians and Forensic Scientific Services as well as the Fraunhofer International Consortium for Anti-infective Research (iCAIR). iCAIR was established between the Institute for Glycomics and two German institutions, the Hannover Medical University and the Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, in 2017.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Institute for Glycomics
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Mark von Itzstein
    Director
    m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5552 7025
    Collaborations
  • Griffith University researchers on the road to COVID-19 vaccine April 2020

    Griffith University researchers have joined forces with scientists from Indian Immunologicals Limited (IIL), a leading vaccine manufacturing company based in Hyderabad, India to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. They aim to develop a live attenuated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine or COVID-19 vaccine using the latest codon de-optimisation technology (a method for producing live weakened virus vaccines). Using this technology, they will make changes to the virus’s genome to decrease replication efficiency in human cells and rendering it harmless. “This technology is promising for developing a live-attenuated vaccine for preventative, active, single dose immunisation against coronavirus in humans, with an enhanced safety profile,” said Professor Suresh Mahalingam from Menzies Health Institute Queensland. The aim is to produce a vaccine provide long-lasting immunity against SARS-CoV-2 following a single immunisation and cross-protection against other coronaviruses such as MERS and SARS-CoV-1.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Menzies Health Institute Queensland (MHIQ)
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Suresh Mahalingam
    NHMRC Senior Research Fellow
    s.mahalingam@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5678 0664
    Collaborations
    Indian Immunologicals Limited (IIL)
  • Can a new modifed BCG tuberculosis vaccine also help protect COVID-19? April 2020

    JCU researchers are exploring the possibility of repurposing the BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccine to protect front-line health workers against COVID-19. BCG is the widely used vaccine against tuberculosis and is associated with reduced rates of COVID-19 infection.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine
    James Cook University

    Contact details
    Doctor Andreas Kupz
    andreas.kupz@jcu.edu.au
    +61 7 4232 2048
  • Developing T-cell vaccine for COVID-19 that is easy to administer, transport and store April 2020

    Professor John Miles is utilising JCU's hyperstable peptide vaccine platform to identify a COVID-19 vaccine candidate in the form of a potentially highly efficient nasal spray that does not require cold chain transport and storage and is easy to administer. Based at JCU's Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, the group, including Professors Louis Schofield and Denise Doolan, is working on pre-clinical development with a view to clinical trials in 18 months. They are seeking investment to continue and accelerate this vaccine development work.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine
    James Cook University

    Contact details
    Professor John Miles
    john.miles@jcu.edu.au
    +61 7 4232 1284
    Collaborations
    • Co-researcher:
    • Professor Denise Doolan
    • Professor Louis Schofield
  • UQ COVID-19 vaccine shown to induce potent protective response moves into human trials April 2020

    Researchers at UQ working on emerging disease preparedness with funding from the global Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), began work on a COVID-19 vaccine in early January 2020. They announced in April that their lead COVID-19 vaccine, which uses a pioneering patented ‘molecular clamp’ technology to lock a component of the deadly virus into a shape that the immune system can easily detect and destroy, had shown an ability in pre-clinical testing to raise high levels of antibodies that can neutralise the virus. Additional funding support to advance manufacturing in parallel with these early studies, was secured from the Queensland and Australian Governments along with generous support from philanthropic foundations and donors. The next critical phase for The University of Queensland’s COVID-19 vaccine is underway with the research effort moving out of the lab and into human trials with the first vaccine dose given at the Herston Health Precinct in Brisbane on 13 July 2020 with preliminary results expected in around three months. If successful they will progress onto the next stage: a larger trial and much larger group from a range of ages. Additional pre-clinical studies are ongoing through UQ’s cooperative partnership with the Netherlands’ Viroclinics Xplore. If successful the UQ vaccine will be progressed by their partners CSL with the potential to distribute an emergency vaccine in 2021. Brisbane-based Thermo Fisher and Swedish Cytiva (provider of technology in therapeutics development and mass manufacture), have also contributed to the accelerated timeframes. UQ and CEPI have entered into a partnering agreement with Australian biotech giant CSL which will take responsibility for Phase 2 clinical studies onwards and, if the clinical trial endpoints are met, will scale up its production facility in Melbourne to manufacture tens of millions of doses in 2021. The Australian Department of Health advise that as the vaccine is still being developed, negotiations with CSL for a formal supply agreement are still ongoing, however Australians will have priority access to a COVID-19 vaccine. CEPI’s dose allocation will be procured and distributed through the COVAX Facility, a mechanism which will make vaccines available globally through an equitable allocation system. According to Advance Queensland, UQ’s vaccine is one of a relatively small group of vaccines under development in the world to have secured a manufacturing deal of such proportion.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Professor Paul Young
    p.young@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 3365 4622
    Collaborations
  • GRIDD researchers take next step in COVID-19 vaccine development March 2020

    Mouse model trials are being run for several COVID-19 vaccine candidates developed by Griffith University scientists. Lead researcher Professor Bernd Rehm at the Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery (GRIDD) has spearheaded the development of the platform technology which uses a synthetic version of the virus (SARS-CoV-2) which means selected virus components are assembled by safe microbial cell factories. This allows rapid vaccine design combined with a high-yield bioprocess for mass production of the vaccine. “Our Centre for Cell Factories and Biopolymers has developed a technology which allows us to quickly adapt to emerging threats by precision engineering vaccines. The approach is based on hijacking the assembly pathways of microbial cells to assemble our own targets in this process.” Professor Rehm, who is the author or co-author of nearly 60 patent applications, said his team has already developed four vaccine candidates containing components of the virus which causes COVID-19. GRIDD developed a platform technology to rapidly respond to newly emerging pathogens not only enabling fast design of new vaccines but also employing a manufacturing process that can be ported across to an industrial production facility to enable supply of vaccine to millions of people within weeks. They have now partnered with Brisbane-based biomanufacturing company Luina Bio to deliver the vaccine candidates.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Professor Bernd Rehm
    Director
    b.rehm@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 3735 4233
    Collaborations
    Luina Bio
  • Developing a nanoparticle-based DNA vaccine for COVID-19 June 2020

    COVID-19 DNA vaccines hold great promise due to the short development timeline, ease of manufacture and good safety profile. This project aims to develop a DNA vaccine formulation for COVID-19, based on a UQ patented nanoparticle technology.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Professor Chengzhong (Michael) Yu
    Senior Group Leader - Yu Group
    c.yu@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 3346 3283
  • UQ vaccine delivery spinout company achieves global deals on vaccine delivery technology July 2020

    The University of Queensland spinout company Vaxxas, that is developing technology based on UQ’s innovative research, has announced two partnerships that could revolutionise the manufacture and delivery of vaccines. The technology platform that allows vaccines to be administered via a small 1 centimetre squared patch with 5000 little projections that are invisible to the naked eye and prick the skin when applied. Merck, a world leader in vaccine development, will access Vaxxas’ HD-MAP technology for the development and manufacture of an undisclosed vaccine. Vaxxas has also announced that German manufacturing equipment maker Harro Höfliger will help Vaxxas develop a high-throughput, aseptic manufacturing line to make vaccine products based their technology — with a goal of eventually churning out millions of vaccine patches a week.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    The University of Queensland

  • Enhancing COVID-19 vaccination and pandemic preparedness via Nanopatch skin delivery. August 2020

    This Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship project, led by Dr. David Muller at UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, takes two Queensland based innovations, the nanopatch and the molecular clamp technology, and combines them to develop a SARS-CoV-2 S-Clamp Nanopatch vaccine. This fellowship will investigate the quality of the immune responses, the patient’s ability to self-vaccinate and the vaccine’s immune signature via systems vaccinology.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    The University of Queensland

    Contact details
    Dr. David Muller
    Senior Research Fellow
    d.muller4@uq.edu.au
    +61 7 3365 4881
    Collaborations
    Vaxxas Technovalia
  • Evaluation of COVID-19 antiviral and vaccine candidates, using a non-infectious virus-like-particle platform. August 2020

    In order to develop a treatment or vaccine for the COVID-19 virus, laboratory based analyses are required. Currently these are restricted to laboratories with high-containment facilities. The Griffith University Institute for Glycomics have developed a non-infectious system, which if scaled up may provide a high-capacity screening platform outside of high-containment laboratories. This Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellowship project led by Dr. Belinda de Villiers at Institute for Glycomics will enable optimisation of this novel testing platform, thereby permitting rapid pre-clinical evaluation of antiviral candidates against COVID-19.

    #Vaccine

    Centre

    Institute for Glycomics
    Griffith University

    Contact details
    Dr. Belinda de Villiers
    Research Fellow
    b.devilliers@griffith.edu.au
    +61 7 5552 9351
    Collaborations
    Gold Coast University Hospital

Other Queensland COVID-19 initiatives

Queensland Government
Coronavirus (COVID-19) business assistance finder
Life Sciences Queensland
Life Sciences Queensland joins the data-powered alliance to stop COVID-19

Key Australian COVID-19 initiatives

Australian Academy of Science
COVID-19 Expert Database
Rapid Research Information Forum (RRIF)

Key international COVID-19 initiatives

CORD-19 (COVID-19 Open Research Dataset)
Free database of 130,000 plus COVID-19 open research papers